email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Ernst Scherzinger
Precision Bench Lathes

Scherzinger Continued on Page 2

From a letter received by the owner of a Scherzinger precision bench lathe in 2013:
Th
ank you for your email and the attached photograph of a Scherzinger Mechanic's lathe.
In fact, Scherzinger built after the Second World War for a period of  approximately four years, such table lathes - about 350 pieces in total.
Unfortunately we have no leaflets or other material (catalogues, descriptions, etc.) about it - only a picture of our stand at a Machine-tool fair in 1949.
After stopping the manufacture in the early 1950s we sold some parts for some time - but these were individually made and soon became too expensive and after that all production ceased.
With the remaining drawings of that time "hobbyist" could produce something if economic factors play a role.
As you can see from our website, the range of Scherzinger has developed in a different direction, away from machine tools. Therefore we see also no point in these lathes in the modern Media record.
We hope you enjoy using the machine.
Our kind greetings, the Management.
Built only as a precision plain-turning lathe (that is, without any form of power feed or screwcutting to the carriage) the Scherzinger joined a crowded post-WW2 European market with competitors  including the well-established firms of G.Boley, Boley & Leinen, Lorch and Wolf, Jahn in Germany and Schaublin and Mikron in Switzerland. Most lathes of this type were offered by their makers in three versions - the Scherzinger was known to have been offered in two: as a second operation lathe for lighter manufacturing duties when fitted with all lever operation of the compound slide, cut-off slide and tailstock and for toolroom use (in German parlance a "mechanic's" lathe) when equipped with the slide rest and tailstock both screw operated and so intended for one-off, high-precision jobs. If the lathe was ever offered as the third type, with a bed-mounted indexing capstan head and lever-action cut-off slide for short-runs of small parts, is not known - an example is certainly missing from a picture of the Company's stand taken at an early 1950s machine-tool exhibition. All versions could be assembled using just the standard bed and drive unit, it being necessary to simply bolt on the required parts.
Bearing a passing resemblance to the Lorch LL-K (though with every detail different) the Scherzinger had a 75 mm (3") centre height, and took 300 mm (13") between centres. The bed was constructed with its as feet as one unit and featured a built-on drive system - a rear-mounted motor fitted with a 3-step V-pulley driving forwards to a housing, formed as an extension to the left-hand face of the headstock-end bed foot, that held a combined clutch/brake unit. From the clutch, which was operated by a long, forward-facing handle, the drive passed inwards to a point beneath the headstock from where a double V-pulley took the drive upwards to the headstock spindle - the letter of large diameter and bored to clear 15 mm. Although not shown on the lathe, it is likely that the three speeds provided would have approximately 700, 1400 and 2800 r.p.m. The spindle ran in bronze bearings, adjustable by castellated nuts at each side the spindle ran in with its M28 x 2 mm threaded nose ground to accept direct-fitting collets - these being retained by either a draw-tube or lever-action collet closer.
Flat-topped, the bed had bevelled edges to locate the compound slide rest and other units( such as the capstan head and cut-off slide); however, the headstock was held in a T-slot on a flat surface formed at the left-hand end of the bed. So that the tailstock could be lever operated (and not held by a through-bolt as the slide rest was), it was aligned against the inside vertical face of the bed's central T-slot and locked down against an angled surface formed on the opposite side.
Although larger makers such as Mikron and Schaublin offered as many as eleven different versions of their compound slide rest, as far as is known Scherzinger made just one; beautifully constructed and superbly finished it was of the typical precision bench lathe type with a covered, full-length, 70 mm travel cross slide and a swivelling, 70 mm travel top slide. Cross-feed screws passed through replaceable bronze nuts with the zeroing micrometer dials of a usefully large diameter, dull-chrome plated and crisply engraved; handwheels were of the balanced type, finished in bright chrome.
On this class of lathe, as the tailstock assumes an importance almost as great as the slide rest and capstan unit. The type fitted to the Scherzinger -  locked to the bed by a powerful cam action arm, with a permanently fitted operating lever -  carried either a screw-feed or lever-action spindle, the basic casting being able to accommodate both. Fully supported within the casting, no matter how far extended, the No. 1 Morse spindle barrel had 50 mm of travel, was engraved with ruler calibrations and, when driven by a screw, had automatically eject of the Morse centre.
Der Scherzinger Drehmaschine ist selten und sollte jeden Leser selbst ein - oder Literatur über sie - der Schriftsteller würde interessieren, von Ihnen zu hören.  More Scherzinger pictures here


Scherzinger stand at a 1949 machine-tool exhibition with two examples of the  Company's precision bench lathes. That on the left is set up as a second-operation lathe with lever-operated slides and tailstock while that on the right is equipped as a toolroom type with the compound slide and tailstock both screw operated. On the right of the stand is a collection of coolant and other pumps, a product that the Company were to eventually specialise in.



Scherzinger Continued on Page 2

Ernst Scherzinger
Precision Bench Lathes

email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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